North & South, Ecology and Justice, Part 3

by Carmelo Ruiz-Marrero  (Last of 3 parts) New beacons Fortunately, there are a fair number of beacons in the quest to form and inform a reconciliation of “progresismo” with ecology and thus carry out the unfulfilled mandates of 20th century “tercermundismo”- these include eco-socialism, social ecology, the global climate justice movement, and “décroissance”, which translates …

North & South, Ecology and Justice, Part 2

by Carmelo Ruiz-Marrero (Second of 3 parts) Beyond sustainable development Sustainable development as defined by the Brundtland Commission and the documents that came out of the Earth Summit did not question the basic assumptions of Western-style development, it merely offered some policy safeguards and technological fixes. According to Chatterjee and Finger, “none of the (Earth …

“The half-life of disaster” by Brian Massumi

ISE Director Brian Tokar recommends this article from Brian Massumi, who translated Deleuze & Guattari’s 1000 Plateaus and several later writings of theirs into English. Here’s an excerpt from the piece: As a counterweight to the conditions of precariousness fostered by disaster capitalism itself, certain key economic sectors are allowed to consolidate through mergers. These quasi-monopolistic …

A Statement from the ISE Board

The Board of the Institute for Social Ecology has asked that the following statement be posted to the Social Ecology Blog and that it be *added as a sort of guideline text for comments on posts and articles on the ISE website: The Institute for Social Ecology is committed to the spirit of free inquiry, and we hope that …

By ISE | March 27th, 2011 | Green & Food Politics, Social Ecology Blog | 10 Comments |

Making a public proposal for a public “debate”

The article “Social ecology needs development, dissent, dynamism” published January 17, 2011 has, as of this writing, received 48 comments and, according to Google Analytics, 871 page views (609 unique views). [from a comment left in response to the “Social ecology needs…” article] Marcus Melder said: I want to suggest a formal debate between a …

By Karl Hardy | March 21st, 2011 | Current Movements, Green & Food Politics, Social Ecology Blog | 9 Comments |

Invitation: 5th Annual Institute for Social Ecology Summer Colloquium

INVITATION & CALL FOR PAPER PROPOSALS: “Social Ecology and the Future of Resistance” Fifth Annual Summer Colloquium – Institute for Social Ecology Marshfield, VT USA August 19-21 Application/Registration Deadline: June 1, 2011 (please see below) Contact: admin@social-ecology.org

Can People Power Overcome Nuclear Power?

[The following are introductory paragraphs from a post by ISE ally Randall Amster published on the New Clear Vision blog.] Search the news for the word “meltdown” these days and you’ll probably get one of three main hits: the situation in Japan; the U.S. economy; and Charlie Sheen. Take a guess which one is most …

By ISE | March 16th, 2011 | Current Movements, Green & Food Politics, Social Ecology Blog | 1 Comments |

The Ecological Integration of Humanity

by Jesse Benn 1. The scientific and biological consideration and organization of independent sub-systems of the ecology, connected together in sequence and in conjunction with the greater whole, are and will be increasingly necessary in order to correct for environmental damage and to control the complex demands of the human and urban metropolitan populations. Sustaining …

Social Ecologist Profile: Grace Gershuny of Barnet, VT USA

Please introduce yourself (What kind of work you do, Where you live, etc.) I live in Barnet, VT – just south of St. Johnsbury, where I’ve lived (with a small lapse) since 1984 in a house that I built with my then husband.  We ran a small market garden for 8 years, and I still …

By Grace Gershuny | March 10th, 2011 | Green & Food Politics, Social Ecology Blog | 1 Comments |

A New Politics

by Bob Spivey, ISE Board Member and SEEDS co-founder Recently I heard reports of Egyptians ordering pizzas for protestors in Wisconsin. Truly we are living in extraordinary times. If the resurgence of Islamic fundamentalism had posed a challenge to the rational, universalist basis of the liberal democratic project, the protests sweeping the Middle East and …